Strange Brand of Happy

Theatrical Release: September 13, 2013
DVD Release: January 6, 2014
Strange Brand of Happy
Dove "Family-Approved"
For Ages 12 and Over

Synopsis

Limited Theatrical Release – After losing his job David is pushed by his roommate to hire a life coach named Joyce. A decision aided in part by how pretty David finds this life coach, but also a desire to get unstuck in life. When Joyce invites him to join the volunteer group she takes to a retirement home David discovers his manipulative ex-boss, William, is part of the group and interested in Joyce as well.

The motley crew of retirees instantly recognize the potential for drama with this love triangle. A wily old man goads the boys to battle for Joyce. As a result, David begrudgingly agrees to go to an open mic night Joyce holds for people to ponder the existence of God. It’s there that a poet says a few things that cause David’s head to tilt and move him a little further down the path of finding himself. The problem is the ungentlemanly competition he’s still in with William. When that turns extreme, David makes a decision that nearly ruins his dual-level progress with Joyce. He’s then forced to turn to the only community he has left, the ragtag band of retirees who point him in the direction of true north.

Dove Review

Rebecca St. James is quite good as the lead in this film. She plays Joyce, a woman who winds up pursued by a couple of men including David and his boss who manipulates David’s schedule so as to spend time with Joyce. The movie is a comedy with some dramatic points being made. The fact that David’s landlord, Terry, who lives right next to him, likes him, complicates matters.

Each person has something unique about himself/herself and each personality is original in some way. In another nice scene a woman comments that we cannot always understand God; for example if she stood above ants they would not understand her. David admits that he used to never really give God much thought, but that changes by film’s end.

We are recommending this one for ages twelve plus, due to a few sophisticated themes and mild innuendos. Enjoy the laughter and this movie just might remind you to look for God’s creativity in the people you meet every day.

Content Description

Sex: A few innuendos; a drunken man briefly puts hand on woman's rear; a comment about not minding seeing a certain woman in spandex; a "She's hot" comment; a double entendre comment of "Can you do me?"; a man asks a woman after her shower what she plans to put on.
Language: Bozo-1; H (as a place)-1; Tool-1
Violence: A man flips through several drawings on a note pad which gives the appearance of animation. The scene is of a man putting a gun to his head, pulling the trigger and flowers come out; a man coming out of a bar knocks another man's cap off his head; a man is escorted by guards from his job after he is fired and he throws mud at the glass door; a man breaks a few bottles against a wall; it's stated a woman's husband once abused her.
Drugs: Several drinking and bar scenes; a man asks for champagne; a character has a hangover; bottle of wine seen on table; beer seen on coffee table; a woman asks a man, "Are you doing drugs?"; man gets bucket of beer and kegs are seen; drinking of champagne; a character is drunk.
Nudity: Mild cleavage.
Other: A joke about getting a rubber football out of a person's rear; a man talks of God in a rather generic way; a few flatulence comments; a man is falsely accused of looking at porn at work and is fired by his boss.

Info

Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter
Source: Theater
Company: Rebel Pilgrim Productions
Writer: Brad Wise
Director: Brad Wise
Producer: Suzette and Charlie Schafer, Joe Boyd, Jim Nyberg
Genre: Limited
Runtime: 95 min.
Industry Rating: Not Rated
Starring: Rebecca St. James, Shirley Jones, Joe Boyd, Marty Ingels