Morning Glory

Theatrical Release: November 10, 2010
Morning Glory
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

When hard-working TV producer Becky Fuller (Rachel McAdams) is fired from a local news program, her career begins to look as bleak as her hapless love life. Stumbling into a job at “Daybreak” (the last-place national morning news show), Becky decides to revitalize the show by bringing on legendary TV anchor Mike Pomeroy (Harrison Ford). Unfortunately, Pomeroy refuses to cover morning show staples like celebrity gossip, weather, fashion and crafts, let alone work with his new co-host, Colleen Peck (Diane Keaton), a former beauty queen and longtime morning show personality, who is more than happy covering morning “news.” As Mike and Colleen clash, first behind the scenes and then on the air, Becky’s blossoming love affair with fellow producer, Adam Bennett (Wilson) begins to unravel. And soon Becky is struggling to save her relationship, her reputation, her job and ultimately, the show.

Dove Review

One of the strengths of this picture is the acting. Rachel McAdams plays Becky Fuller, TV producer, as a flighty and lonely-for-love girl with a tough side when necessary and she pulls it off. She even stands up to Harrison Ford’s character, a legendary TV anchorman named Mike Pomeroy, so egotistical that he ignores instructions while on air and goes with the moment in the way he chooses. During an Easter piece he refuses to say the word “fluffy”.

As Becky Fuller attempts to save the morning show “Daybreak” she believes Pomeroy is the right man to co-host the show along with Colleen Peck (Diane Keaton), who brings her own style of toughness to the show. Yet getting Pomeroy to climb on board with her vision is the catch. Becky believes the reporters need to become more entertaining for their audience. Sure enough, the ratings climb. But Pomeroy still doesn’t want to go along with the changes and the question becomes whether Fuller can save the program in time before the ratings bury the show.

Ford is frequently hilarious by just using his great facial expressions including a dead-pan veneer when he doesn’t like the on-screen happenings. There is romance added to the film in the form of Patrick Wilson who plays Becky’s fellow producer, Adam Bennett. The movie speaks on issues such as balancing careers and a personal life, and a stick-to-it mentality to achieve certain goals. Unfortunately for the family, it is loaded with strong language in addtion to including sex outside of marriage so we cannot award our Dove “Family-Approved” Seal to the film.

Content Description

Sex: A couple has sex outside of marriage; several sexual innuendos and comments; man places hand on woman's rear; kissing; a character mentions a particular porn site at a meeting and is dismissed from his job.
Language: GD-2; G/OMG-18; J/JC-7; For Ch*ist Sake-4; F-4; Motherf (rest not heard)-1; S-8; H-5; A-8; D-2; B-4; Suck-1; Slang for testicles-1; Crapper-1
Violence: A reporter is wounded from an incident on TV, nothing serious.
Drugs: A few drinking scenes; characters at the bar; a comment of "Now is an excellent time to take up drinking"; a character takes prescription pills; a comment about erectile dysfunction medication.
Nudity: Thigh seen on a photo of a girl; part of woman's rear seen as she wears skimpy panties; cleavage; shirtless man.
Other: Disrespectful attitudes; a character speaks of his fractured relationship with his grown kids.

Info

Company: Paramount
Director: Roger Michell
Producer: J.J. Abrams
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 105 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter