Eat Pray Love

Theatrical Release: August 13, 2010
Eat Pray Love
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
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Synopsis

Liz Gilbert (Roberts) had everything a modern woman is supposed to dream of having – a husband, a house, a successful career – yet like so many others, she found herself lost, confused, and searching for what she really wanted in life. Newly divorced and at a crossroads, Gilbert steps out of her comfort zone, risking everything to change her life, embarking on a journey around the world that becomes a quest for self-discovery. In her travels, she discovers the true pleasure of nourishment by eating in Italy; the power of prayer in India, and, finally and unexpectedly, the inner peace and balance of true love in Bali. Based upon the bestselling memoir by Elizabeth Gilbert.

Dove Review

This is an unconventional story of a woman’s (Julia Roberts) search for meaning in life as well as love. When a relationship goes bad she decides to leave her home and travel abroad and experience what else is out there. It is not explained how she could afford all this travel and she doesn’t appear to be rich, but I digress.

Her search for meaning at times is a bit unusual. She prays in India but the Bible is not the focus. A comment is made that the god within you is you! However, it is the more conventional story of her search for love which carries more weight in this film. A nice romance is concocted and it is among the film’s best moments. It is nice that a character cares about learning if there is a greater meaning to her life, but it would have been nice if she would have wound up helping feed the needy, or some concrete example like that.

Needless to say, Italy and India have some good and bad moments for Liz Gilbert (Roberts). Likewise, there are some good and bad moments for the audience. But, with some frank sexual remarks included in the movie, and very strong language, not to mention rear male nudity and a lot of drinking scenes; this film falls short of receiving our Dove “Family-Approved” Seal. “Despicable Me” is still showing, and it is not a despicable film at all! In fact, it is Dove approved, as is “Step Up”.

Content Description

Sex: Frank sexual comments; innuendos; slang for having sex; kissing; a couple is briefly seen making out; sex outside of marriage is implied; a comment about sleeping with someone else's wife.
Language: GD-1; G/OMG-7; J-2; F-1; S-7; A-3; Crap-3; D-3; H-2; Slang for having sex-2; Slang for male genitalia-1
Violence: A woman is almost run over by a character on a bike; woman falls on road and receives a bloody leg as a result.
Drugs: A comment about having too much alcohol and too many drugs in the past; several scenes with drinking including drinking wine with meals; it is stated a character "was bombed"; brief smoking scene.
Nudity: Male rear nudity; woman sees frontal nudity of man but audience doesn't; cleavage; shirtless men; statue of nude man but not explicit; top of panties seen.
Other: Praying in India is featured but the Bible is not the focus; a comment about god being within one's self as one's self; some bad attitudes are featured; a few hand gestures including a few obscene ones.

Info

Company: Columbia Tri-Star Pictures
Writer: Ryan Murphy & Jennifer Salt
Director: Ryan Murphy
Producer: Dede Gardner
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 133 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Starring: Julia Roberts, I. Gusti Ayu Puspawati, Hadi Subiyanto, James Franco
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter