Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles

Theatrical Release: April 20, 2001
DVD Release: September 18, 2001
Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles
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sex
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Synopsis

How long has it been since Paul Hogan’s grizzled but charming alter ego appeared in a new movie? Well, long enough for the character, Crocodile Dundee, and his American companion, Sue Charleton (Hogan’s real-life wife, Linda Kozlowski), to have raised a 9-year-old son, Mikey (Serge Cockburn), in the rough-and-tumble Australian outback that Dundee calls home. As with its two predecessors, however, Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles is no domestic comedy but a fish-out-of-water comic adventure, this time finding Dundee and his mate Jacko (Alec Wilson) relocated in balmy Southern California to help journalist Sue investigate a crooked studio executive. The jokes are predictable (L.A. traffic, Hollywood phonies, yoga) but fun, anyway, and there are some celebrity cameos to spice things up. Australian director Simon Wincer, who worked with Hogan on Lightning Jack, is very effective at keeping this light material briskly moving along even if he can’t make it any more memorable than it has a right to be. All in all, this is a pleasant but forgettable experience, a far cry from the Capra-esque leanings of Hogan’s first screen outing as Crocodile Dundee.

Dove Review

Mick Dundee as played by Paul Hogan does have charm. There is no denying that. When he finds himself in a Los Angeles cab the driver, who is a would-be writer/actor, finds out Mick’s companion is a news reporter. The taxi driver hands Mick a photo of himself which he has stockpiled in a bag. Mick thanks him and then hands him one of himself with his son. It’s his innocent ways in living in L.A. and his nice guy charm which helps this movie along.

Although the movie is funny in spots and has themes of loyalty and perseverance, it also has strong language and a couple who have lived together for years, until they finally do “make it legal” as the lead character puts it in the end. We are unable to award this film our “Dove “Family-Approved” Seal.

Content Description

Sex: An unmarried couple live together and have a son but they do marry in the movie; a kid comments that a woman "has a nice a__"; kissing; a male character grabs his crotch.
Language: G/OMG-3; S-5; A-6; H-7; Bloody-3; D-1; Bu*t-1; B-2; P-1
Violence: A crocodile attacks a couple of boats but no one is killed; the hand of a thief is broken by another character; a man uses a knife on an anaconda in a theme park as he doesn't realize it is electronic and part of the tour; a kid throws an object at a rat in a schoolroom and stuns it; a man with a gun tries a hold-up; a man whacks a worker in the head; a man chases a character with a gun and shoots at him; a gun held to woman's head; a large cover is thrown over a man. a man falls while on a ladder; a man accidentally runs into a wall while driving a cart.
Drugs: Drinking of beer and champagne; a woman has a cigar which someone takes from her.
Nudity: Cleavage; girls in bathing suits; shirtless men; a character is seen in bathtub but nothing graphic is seen.
Other: A man meditates and mentions Buddha; a comment about PMS; a company is involved in some shady dealings.

Info

Company: Paramount
Writer: Paul Hogan and Matthew Berry
Director: Simon Wincer
Producer: Lance Hool
Genre: Adventure
Runtime: 94 min.
Industry Rating: PG
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter