The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

Theatrical Release: May 15, 2008
DVD Release: December 2, 2008
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
Dove "Family-Approved"
For Ages 12 and Over

Synopsis

One year after the incredible events of “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” the Kings and Queens of Narnia find themselves back in that faraway wondrous realm, only to discover that more than 1300 years have passed in Narnian time. During their absence, the Golden Age of Narnia has become extinct, Narnia has been conquered by the Telmarines and is now under the control of the evil King Miraz, who rules the land without mercy.

The four children will soon meet an intriguing new character: Narnia’s rightful heir to the throne, the young Prince Caspian, who has been forced into hiding as his uncle Miraz plots to kill him in order to place his own newborn son on the throne. With the help of the kindly dwarf, a courageous talking mouse named Reepicheep, a badger named Trufflehunter and a Black Dwarf, Nikabrik, the Narnians, led by the mighty knights Peter and Caspian, embark on a remarkable journey to find Aslan, rescue Narnia from Miraz’s tyrannical hold, and restore magic and glory to the land.

Dove Review

This follow-up to “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe” is a darker, more intense version of “The Chronicles of Narnia.” There is a bit more evil to contend with in this one. As a dwarf in the film says: “You might find Narnia a more savage place then you remember.” The wicked King Miraz (Sergio Castellitto) fights against his nephew, Prince Caspian (Ben Barnes), the rightful heir to the throne of Narnia. Yet there is still plenty of charm left over from the first installment, with the addition of some fascinating new characters and the return of the four rulers from the first movie, namely Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy. These four have all grown as characters since the first story, and it shows in the film’s plot line.

Despite the intense scenes, there are several moments of humor sprinkled into the story, such as when a bear pursues young Lucy until he is taken down by her new friend, a dwarf. “Why wouldn’t the bear stop?” asks Lucy. “I suspect he was hungry,” replies the dwarf.

The movie includes several fierce battle sequences involving sword fights, duels, and the shooting of arrows. The film’s themes of perseverance, loyalty and the fight against evil are to be applauded. The wonderful symbolic character of the savior Aslan returns, but as he says in the movie, “Nothing happens exactly the same way twice.” There are a few surprises in store for both our heroes and for the audience. This is a wonderful story filled with action and fantastic special effects. Return once more to Narnia where fantasies live and anything is possible. Don’t miss this one! It’s as exciting as the first time around! We gladly award this film five Doves, our highest rating.

Content Description

Sex: Kissing by a young couple.
Language: None
Violence: Intense battle scenes throughout; a soldier drowns; two characters duel; another intense duel between two characters; several soldiers and characters shot by arrows; several sword fights which result in death; a bear is shot; blood is seen on a character's mouth after he is hit; a character's hand is sliced and some blood seen; a decapitation though not graphic but it's clear what happened; ground opens up and swallows several characters; a few characters die by falling from heights; living trees which grab for characters; raging waters drown several characters.
Drugs: None
Nudity: Shirtless creatures, half man and half horse.
Other: A man has his own brother killed and intends to kill his nephew; a woman's pain is seen during childbirth in a scene in the beginning; a fantasy world filled with allegorical magic such as a magic horn.

Info

Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter
Source: Theater
Company: Walt Disney
Writer: Andrew Adamson and Christopher Markus
Director: Andrew Adamson
Producer: Mark Johnson
Genre: Adventure
Runtime: 140 min.
Industry Rating: PG
Starring: Ben Barnes,
Georgie Henley,
Skandar Keynes,
William Moseley,
Anna Popplewell