P.S. I Love You

Theatrical Release: December 21, 2007
P.S. I Love You
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Synopsis

Holly Kennedy (Hilary Swank) is beautiful, smart, and married to the love of her life-a passionate, funny and impetuous Irishman named Gerry (Gerard Butler). So when Gerry’s life is taken by an illness, it takes the life out of Holly. The only one who can help her is the person who is no longer there. Nobody knows Holly better than Gerry. So it’s a good thing he planned ahead. Before he died, Gerry wrote Holly a series of letters that will guide her, not only through her grief but in rediscovering herself. The first message arrives on Holly’s 30th birthday in the form of a cake and, to her utter shock, a tape recording from Gerry, who proceeds to order her to get out and “celebrate herself.” In the weeks and months that follow, more letters from Gerry are delivered in surprising ways, each sending her on a new adventure and each signing off in the same way: P.S. I Love You. Holly’s mother (Kathy Bates) and best friends, Sharon (Gina Gershon) and Denise (Lisa Kudrow), begin to worry that Gerry’s letters are keeping Holly tied to the past, but, in fact, each letter is pushing her further into a new future. With Gerry’s words as her guide, Holly embarks on a touching, exciting and often hilarious journey of rediscovery in a story about marriage, friendship and how a love so strong can turn the finality of death into new beginning for life.

Dove Review

Although uproariously funny at times, this romantic comedy does not meet Dove’s standards as a family-friendly film. There is a one-night-stand between two unmarried characters, strong language, and a lot of sexual comments and innuendos, as well as a brief nudity scene.

The premise is a heartwarming one, in which a character has arranged to send his wife letters and gifts after he dies, to encourage her. Every letter concludes with “P.S. I love you”. Both Hilary Swank and Gerard Butler are on in their respective roles, and there are comedic moments from the other characters as well. A single woman asks men if they are married or gay and if they have jobs. If the first two answers are no and the third yes, she continues talking with them. If not, she simply walks away. In one truly funny moment she learns a man is not married, not gay and has a job. But when she places a trial kiss on him, she simply turns and walks away in a moment which had the lively audience I screened this film with laughing loudly.

It’s too bad that this creative and imaginative film had to be diluted with some language and other content which prevents us from awarding our Dove “Family-Approved” Seal to the picture.

Content Description

Sex: An unmarried man and woman spend the night together; strong sexual innuendos throughout the film.
Language: GD-1; G/OMG-13; S-7; B-9; A-7; Slang for male genitalia-2; SOB-2; H-2; D-1; A couple of "geez" comments although I don't believe any were J; Sl*t-1; Bloody-2
Violence: A couple have a disagreement and throw a few things but nothing major.
Drugs: Drinking in several scenes.
Nudity: Male rear nudity; cleavage; shirtless men; a few women scantily clad.
Other: A widow visits a gay bar with some friends; the word "faggots" in a song.

Info

Company: Warner Brothers
Writer: Richard LaGravenese and Steven Rogers
Producer: Wendy Finerman
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 126 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter