I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry

Theatrical Release: July 20, 2007
I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
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Synopsis

In their latest comedy, Sandler and James play two straight guys who stumble down the aisle with the best of intentions in I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry. The pride of their Brooklyn fire station, Chuck Levine (Sandler) and Larry Valentine (James) are two guys’ guys — always side-by-side and willing to do anything for each other. Salt-of-the-earth widower Larry wants just one thing: to protect his family. His buddy Chuck also wants one thing: to enjoy the single life.

Grateful Chuck owes Larry for saving his life on the job, and Larry calls in that favor big time when civic red tape prevents him from naming his own two kids as his life insurance beneficiaries. All that Chuck has to do is claim to be Larry’s domestic partner on some city forms. Easy. Nobody will ever know.

But when an overzealous, spot-checking bureaucrat becomes suspicious, the new couple’s arrangement becomes a citywide issue and goes from confidential to front-page news. Forced to improvise as love-struck newlyweds, Chuck and Larry must now fumble through a hilarious charade of domestic bliss under one roof. And after surviving their mandatory honeymoon and dodging the threat of exposure, the well-intentioned con men discover that sticking together in your time of need is what truly makes a family.

Dove Review

This movie has something in it to offend just about everybody. I really went into it hoping to enjoy the inside jokes about the farce Larry and Chuck were attempting to pull off. But it has strong language, nudity, sexual innuendos throughout, deceit as a continuing theme of the plot, a comment about Mel Gibson, a woman who is nude from the waist up who is groped on screen, etc. I thought the plot might deliver several funny moments. I was wrong. It delivered very few.

Another thing that bothered me about the film is that it preached tolerance yet when an over-zealous minister protests outside a gay club, he is punched out by Sandler’s character. We thought tolerance was a two-way street. Whatever a person’s beliefs, this film includes enough insults to wake Rodney Dangerfield from the dead. It has strong insults against gays, straights, you name it. Rest assured this film has an agenda but as a comedy, it falls flat. We cannot approve this one as a family-friendly film.

Content Description

Sex: Frank discussions about sex; a man openly has had several partners; a man who is pretending to be gay gropes a female; sexual images on a calendar; barely dressed people at a nightclub; a woman sleeps with two men.
Language: GD-1; G/OMG-17; A-18; S-12; H-14; Slang for breasts-1; Slang for male genitalia-7; P-3; Cr*p-1; Several slang comments about gays.
Violence: A minister is punched and knocked down; several fires and some close calls.
Drugs: Drinking in a few scenes; marijuana is found at a fire; smoking.
Nudity: Upper female nudity; rear male nudity; several characters, men and women, dressed in thongs or very little; women dressed in lingerie; cleavage; men almost naked on a calender.
Other: Insults against gays, insults against straights; a man deals with an effeminate son; a man grieves his wife's death; a burned rat is seen; porno magazines and DVDs are seen briefly and a porno doll; two males kiss at a wedding; vegetables are made to look like male genitalia.

Info

Company: Universal Pictures
Writer: Barry Fanaro and Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor
Director: Dennis Dugan
Producer: Michael Bostick
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 140 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter