White Noise

Theatrical Release: January 7, 2005
White Noise
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Synopsis

People have always searched for a way to communicate with the other side-fascinated, motivated, driven to find a way to connect with loved ones who have passed on.

Electronic Voice Phenomenon (EVP) is the process through which the dead communicate with the living through household recording devices. These extraordinary recordings-captured by people all over the world, in their homes, with a simple tape or video recorder-seem to confirm what many of us have dared to believe: it is possible for the dead to communicate with us.

And all we have to do is listen.

Now, from Universal Pictures and Gold Circle Films comes the suspense thriller that explores this very-real other-wordly communication-White Noise. Tapping into our deepest fears and most profound longings. White Noise forces us to re-examine the world in which we live and , in the process, question our most basic notions about life and death.

Michael Keaton plays successful architect Jonathan Riverss whose peaceful existence is shattered by the unexplained dissapearance and death of his wife, Linda (Chandra West). Jonathan is eventually contacted by a man (Ian McNeice), who claims to be receiving messages from Linda through EVP. At first skeptical, Jonathan then becomes convinced of the messages’ validity, and is soon obsessed with trying to contact her on his own. His further explorations into EVP and the accompanying supernatural messages unwittingly open a door to another world, allowing something uninvited into his life.

Dove Review

After the last two “scary” movies that arrived in theatres (darkness, the grudge), it was nice to view a movie that actually instilled some fear in me. White Noise was a very good movie, I was very impressed with the writing. It was nice how they didn’t just throw the viewers into the whole EVP concept- they showed Keaton’s character being introduced to it, and his first experiences by himself, so the viewers knew just as much as he did. This film is comparable to “Mothman Prophecies”, as the concept of the movie frightens you more than specific scenes, coaxing the viewers to believe that these things are real. I found myself contemplating in the parking lot what to believe, which was made more difficult by the movie showing statistics about EVP.

This film is not Dove approved, mostly due to the concept. The ability of the dead to communicate with us is the main theme, as stated above. There were also a couple instances where “Oh my God” was used- also excluding the film from a Dove approval. I only recommend this flick to adults who are big fans of scary movies, and can tolerate the concept and language, go right ahead. The kids should stay home for this one, as many sleepless nights may follow.

Content Description

Sex: None
Language: 1 F, 3 S’s, 2 OMG’s, 1 G, 2 D’s. B**** was written, as was the word “bastard”.
Violence: None
Drugs: Woman shown drinking wine.
Nudity: Butt shown in video on tv.
Occult: Concept of the dead being able to communicate with us via EVP theme

Info

Company: Universal Pictures
Director: Geoffrey Sax
Producer: Paul Brooks and Shawn Williamson
Genre: Suspense
Runtime: 98 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Bradley B. Klinge