Harrisons Flowers

Theatrical Release: March 15, 2002
Harrisons Flowers
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sex
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violence
drugs
nudity
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Synopsis

Veteran photographer Harrison (David Strathairn) is sent to cover a violent outbreak in Yugoslavia. He leaves behind two young children, wife Sarah (Andie MacDowell), and a desire to give up this dangerous lifestyle to spend more time with his family. Several days later, Sarah receives word of David’s death in the war-torn country, but refuses to believe it based on a mysterious phone call she receives the night before. Holing herself up in her house, she refuses to see anybody and stays glued to the television, waiting to see an image of Harrison. Her obsession grows, until she finally gets his traveling bag, recovered some time after his death. This prompts her to travel to Yugoslavia and track down her husband or his body. While a solid and well-acted story, it lacks a commanding screen presence or overwhelming emotion needed to attract big audiences.

Dove Review

The film shows great respect and honor for civilian news photographers who risk their lives to illuminate stories in far off lands few people would otherwise be aware of. One scene portrays an innocent man graphically shot in the head. In another, photographers come upon a bus filled with presumably innocent, dead civilians. None of the violence is glorified or exploited, but still difficult to watch. Vulgar language, including 79 obscenities and four strong profanities, wilts Harrison’s Flowers.

Content Description

Info

Company: Universal Pictures
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 122 min.
Industry Rating: R
Reviewer: Movie Morality Ministries - John Adair