Onegin

Network Premier: December 17, 1999
Onegin
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Adapted from Alexander Pushkin’s novel, this romantic tragedy concerns a brooding and snobbish St Petersburg nobleman who moves to the country, taking ownership of his dead uncle’s home and lands. While there he becomes friends with, although he feels far superior to, his next-door neighbor, and he forms an attraction for the sister of his friend’s fiancé. The beautiful young woman declares her love for him, but Eugene Onegin feels above her station. Not until years later, after she marries royalty, does he admit to himself that he loves her. “Onegin” is now playing on several cable movie stations, including Starz! Theater.

Dove Review

Moody and purposely slow paced, this incisive character study is well acted and engrossing. Rather than focusing on romantic implications, the script examines the foolishness of caste systems. Although it contains a couple of mildly objectionable scenes, including a brief licentious conversation between three male friends and a sketch of a nude man, this material serves to point out the lead’s character. “Onegin” is an indictment of pretentiousness, self-indulgence, and a lack of spiritual interest. The revealing performances and exquisite cinematography make this interesting viewing, but if you are looking for something a little more uplifting, try “Sense and Sensibility.”

Content Description

Sex: Implied sexual situation with a prostitute; a crude sexual conversation; husband and wife are shown kissing and holding each other.
Language: OG-2; a few expletives.
Violence: Man killed in a duel and his bloody head wound is shown.
Drugs: Woman smokes; drinking at parties; party guest is tipsy from too much wine.
Nudity: Sketch of a nude man with an erection.
Other: None

Info

Company: Samuel Goldwyn Films
Writer: Peter Ettedgui and Michael Ignatieff
Director: Martha Fiennes
Producer: Ileen Maisel and Simon Bosanquet
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 106 min.
Industry Rating: TV-14
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Liv Tyler.
Reviewer: Phil Boatwright