Jackie

Theatrical Release: December 2, 2016
Jackie

Synopsis

JACKIE is a portrait of one of the most important and tragic moments in American history, seen through the eyes of the iconic First Lady, then Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (Natalie Portman). JACKIE places us in her world during the days immediately following her husband’s assassination. Known for her extraordinary dignity and poise, here we see a portrait of the First Lady as she fights to establish her husband’s legacy and the world of “Camelot” that she created and loved so well.

Dove Review

“Jackie” features a mesmerizing performance by Natalie Portman as the charming First Lady who once presided over what she called “Camelot”. Portman’s speech and diction as Jackie are expertly delivered, and she is woven into real scenes that took place in the White House. The film, shot with a grainy film stock, blends perfectly into the archived film that is used in various spots of the movie. This is a real portrait of what Jackie Kennedy went through in the first few days following her husband’s assassination. She is seen giving an interview to a reporter and she tells him certain details “will not be published.”

For history buffs and for people who lived during the time of the Kennedy assassination, this recreation lends a strong authenticity to the time period in its clothes, hair styles, automobiles, and sets. But it is Portman, who has received Oscar buzz for her performance and a Golden Globe nomination for best actress, who takes us into the world of being in the spotlight and planning the funeral for the most famous man in the world. She shares intimate thoughts with the reporter, including comments like, “His blood and brains were in my lap. I said, ‘Jack, Jack, can you hear me? I love you, Jack.'” She also says, through tears, “His eyes were opened. I knew he was dead.” The movie does its job in presenting a glimpse into a fascinating First Lady and into what she endured as she steadfastly marched forward, setting an example of strength for the nation. She has moments of changing her mind in planning the funeral, and she goes from great grief to being strong. Her character as well as her doubts are expertly shown in the film. The strong acting, including that of Peter Sarsgaard as Bobby Kennedy, along with tight direction, combine to bring a tragic story to the screen. Sadly, due to the violent recreations in the film and strong language, we are unable to award the movie our Dove Seal.

Content Description

Sex: A woman refers to her husband's affairs as him being tempted by the devil in the desert but she says he always came back to her.
Language: GD-2; O/G-1; JC-1; F-2; a**hole-1; D-1
Violence: A scene of the president's assassination, which includes him being hit with a bullet and then blood spraying as he is hit in the head by a bullet; torn flesh is seen on the president's head and his bloody head is seen cradled on Jackie's lap; Jackie mentions holding a piece of his skull; Jackie is seen with the president's blood on her clothes and on her face; blood is seen coming off Jackie's back as she showers; archived TV footage of Oswald being shot.
Drugs: Several scenes of smoking cigarettes and a woman smoking in bed; a man holds what appears to be a drink on the plane; a woman takes a pill after being told to rest; a woman takes a pill in a couple of other scenes and she has pills laid out on a table; it's mentioned Jackie had parties with artists and champagne at the White House; a woman pours herself a drink; a woman is seen drinking wine.
Nudity: A woman's bare back and her shoulders are visible as she showers.
Other: Tension between characters; Jackie is in shock after the president's assassination; Jackie speaks with a priest and wonders if God is cruel and when the priest says God is everywhere she asks him if God was in the bullet that killed her husband; grief; a funeral procession.

Info

Reviewer: Edwin L Carpenter
Source: Theater
Company: Fox Searchlight Pictures
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 100 min.
Industry Rating: R
Starring: Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard, Greta Gerwig