Ghostbusters (2016)

Theatrical Release: July 15, 2016
Ghostbusters (2016)
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Ghostbusters makes its long-awaited return, rebooted with a cast of new characters. Thirty years after the beloved original took the world by storm, director Paul Feig brings his take to the supernatural comedy. This summer, they’re here to save the world!

Dove Review

“Ghostbusters (2016)” is a remake of what many fans of the original film consider to be a classic. A reboot can be tricky because of people’s expectations. In this case, the Ghostbusters are all female and have a male secretary. However, some of the original concept remains, including the hearse, which is turned into the classic Ghostbusters’ car with the familiar logo, as well as the music and the uniforms. Even some of the old ghosts are back, or at least their look-alikes, and a certain “incarnation” of the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man makes an appearance.

The movie is actually fairly entertaining and features some humorous ghosts. In fact, one of the former “slime” ghosts of the original movie winds up with a girlfriend counterpart and, along with some buddies, they cruise the streets of New York in the Ghostbusters’ car. It was a funny scene and drew laughs from the audience. There are also funny moments from the stars, including Melissa McCarthy as Abbey, Kristen Wiig as Erin, Kate McKinnon as Jillian, and Leslie Jones as Patty. Chris Hemsworth plays their secretary and does a funny dance during the closing credits. Original Ghostbusters make cameo appearances, including Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Ernie Hudson. Annie Potts, the original film’s secretary, shows up briefly, as does Sigourney Weaver and a bust of Harold Ramis. Ozzy Osbourne makes an appearance. Seeing a very mean ghost wreak havoc at a rock concert, Osbourne cries out, “Sharon, I’m having a flashback!” The ghosts show up often in this movie.

The film does have its entertaining moments. Ernie Hudson plays Patty’s uncle, who owns the hearse they use. When he shows up to claim it, they have to explain that it was taken into a ghostly portal. Patty’s uncle only has one car and has a few funerals scheduled for the same day. When one character suggests he does a double funeral, he replies, “I can’t stack them on top of each other like flapjacks!” In another scene, a man, who is terrified after seeing a ghost, screams like a young girl. Despite some comedic moments, the film contains strong language, which prevents us from awarding it our coveted Dove Seal.

Content Description

Sex: A few innuendos and some brief suggestive dancing.
Language: J-1; G/OMG/OG-29; Good G-1; A kissing-1; A-6; H-7; a "Burn in Hell" comment; H (as a place)-1; D-3; Idiot-2; Frickin'-1; Holy Crap-1; P.O.-1; Slang for breasts-1; Su*k it-2; Big, Dumb-1; Poop-1; Butt-1
Violence: A lot of fantasy violence, including scary-looking ghosts slapping people around and throwing a man out of a window; ghosts slime several characters; Ghostbusters use powerful, laser-like rifles on ghosts and put them into boxes; a lot of damage is done to various buildings; car crashes; a ghost fights the Ghostbusters at a rock concert; ghost knocks out two security guards; a ghost squashes a taxi cab.
Drugs: Person asks, "Am I on crack?"; drinking in some scenes, including beer; Ozzy Osbourne, terrified of the ghosts, says he is having a "flashback."
Nudity: Shirtless man in photos; cleavage in a scene or two.
Other: Statement that God may have been drunk when He made a certain woman, who is very disliked; a joke about a person years ago who put up an "anti-Irish" security fence; paranormal activity with ghosts, and some of them are very frightening in appearance; flatulence; a joke about slime getting into "every crack" on a person; a man "flips off" the women a few times in a row; a man, who doesn't like coffee, spits it back in the cup, and a woman, who likes him, drinks it right after he does; heads and hands of ghosts shown in mirrors.

Info

Company: Sony/Columbia
Director: Paul Feig
Producer: Amy Pascal
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 108 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Edwin L Carpenter