Race (2016)

Theatrical Release: February 19, 2016
Race (2016)
0
1
2
3
4
5
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Jesse Owens’ quest to become the greatest track-and-field athlete in history thrusts him onto the world stage of the 1936 Olympics, where he faces off against Adolf Hitler’s vision of Aryan supremacy.

Dove Review

“Race” is an authentic film about the inspiring life of Olympian Jesse Owens. The title’s double entendre is on purpose. It not only deals with the important races of the real-life Jesse Owens, who landed on the U.S. Olympic Team in track and field in 1936, but “race” is also an issue in the story, as Hitler and the Nazis discourage the participation of Jews and blacks during the games, without success — at least for the most part. Yet, ultimately, the movie is about the indomitable spirit of Owens.

The film does a good job in showing the chemistry between the various characters, including Jesse and his coach, Larry Snyder (Jason Sudeikis). Shanice Banton plays his wife, Ruth, and Jeremy Irons portrays the United States Olympic Representative, Avery Brundage. He brings a toughness and abrasive nature to the part.

The film covers Jesse’s practices and training at The Ohio State University and a day in which he set several records in May 1935, in Ann Arbor, Mich. It features his tumultuous times, too, such as when a newspaper photo of him with another woman almost breaks up his relationship with his fiancée Ruth, the mother of his young daughter. Ultimately, the story leads to Jesse’s crucial decision on whether or not to run in the games, with Hitler and his party’s hatred for Jews and blacks on display. Eventually, he decides the right thing to do is race in front of the Fuhrer — and he lands four gold medals and sets records along the way. When he becomes friends with a German runner, his rival, their friendship is icing on the cake.

Regrettably, “Race” contains strong language throughout the film, in addition to a sexual scene that goes beyond our family-friendly guidelines, so we cannot award the movie our Dove “Family-Approved” Seal.

Content Description

Sex: A man and woman have a daughter out of wedlock but get married in the film; a woman comes on strongly to a character, and there is a close-up of her rear; a man cheats on his fiancée but apologizes; man places his hand on woman's rear while they are dancing; passionate kissing.
Language: GD-6; G-1; For G's Sake-2; JC-1; Mother F-1; H-11; A-4; A**hole-1; S-2; BS-2; Pi*sed-1; D-6; Crap-1; Idiot-1; Several uses of racist terms, such as "ni*gers," "krauts" and "crackers"; Slang for testicles-1
Violence: Some shoving goes on; a few characters are punched; some Jews are treated roughly when thrown out of apartments.
Drugs: Drinking and smoking in several scenes; bar scenes.
Nudity: Shirtless men and men in shorts; cleavage.
Other: Racist issues leading up to and during the 1936 Olympics in Germany; two Jews are left off a relay race, due to interference of German officials working with an American; tension between characters; arguments.

Info

Company: Focus Features
Director: Stephen Hopkins
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 134 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter