Angels In The Outfield

Theatrical Release: April 19, 1995
DVD Release: April 23, 2002
Angels In The Outfield
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Synopsis

Destined to be one of the most endearing fantasy pictures of 1994, ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD is a marvelous remake of a 1951 film of the same name. Abandoned by his father and living in a foster home, twelve year old Roger Bowman (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) longs for a family. He also desperately wants his favorite baseball team, the California Angels, to win the pennant. One night, he prays that God will help the team to win and his prayers are heard. Real angels, which only Roger can see, start to help the players to catch fly balls, hit home runs and pitch sizzling fast balls. Also, the comical, witty chief angel, Al (Christopher Lloyd), appears to Roger regularly to give him instructions and encouragement. The manager of the Angels team, George Knox (Danny Glover), is hot tempered and verbally abusive, but softens as he’s befriended and aided by Roger. Though skeptical of Roger’s ability to see angels, George eventually becomes a believer. Like most baseball films, this one builds to a final crucial pennant game and the Angels weary pitcher holds the key to success. Fun and heartwarming, ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD will not only appeal to young people, but mom and dad will love it too.

Dove Review

This movie just might remind you that anything is possible, and it might make you smile at the same time. Twelve-year-old Roger (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) begins to see angels soon after praying for a miracle. He hopes if the Angels win the pennant, he will be reunited with his Dad, who is irresponsible and having a hard time since the death of his wife and Roger’s mother. Roger lives in a foster care home with a young friend named J.P. and the owner of the home, Maggie, who has a heart of gold. The Angels begin to come on strong in mid summer, and at one point in the film, when Maggie is asked point blank at a press conference if she believes angels play baseball, she replies, “Since July, yes!”

The film has some mild language and Angels’ manager George Knox (Danny Glover) throws some temper tantrums until the real angels help soften his heart. The team bonds and begins to believe and, as they believe, the miracles increase in this delightful movie. The characters are memorable, including a pitcher played by Tony Danza. We gladly award our Dove Seal to this enjoyable film.

Content Description

Sex: None
Language: D-4; A-2; Butt head/Butts-2
Violence: Manager and player gets into a fight on the field; a player throws bat in anger; the manager pushes buffet table over in anger; manager punches announcer
Drugs: A few scenes with smoking; radio announcer drinks while on air.
Nudity: None
Other: Belching; announcer puts cigarette out in partner's coffee; a character rides a motorcycle without a helmet;

Info

Company: Buena Vista Home Video
Writer: Dorothy Kingsley and George Wells and Holly Goldberg Sloan
Director: William Dear
Producer: Roger Birnbaum
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 102 min.
Industry Rating: PG
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter