47 Ronin

Theatrical Release: December 25, 2013
47 Ronin
Not Recommended for Families

Synopsis

From ancient Japan’s most enduring tale, the epic 3D fantasy-adventure 47 Ronin is born. Keanu Reeves leads the cast as Kai, an outcast who joins Oishi (Hiroyuki Sanada), the leader of 47 outcast samurai. Together they seek vengeance upon the treacherous overlord who killed their master and banished their kind. To restore honor to their homeland, the warriors embark upon a quest that challenges them with a series of trials that would destroy ordinary warriors.

47 Ronin is helmed by visionary director Carl Erik Rinsch (The Gift). Inspired by styles as diverse as Miyazaki and Hokusai, Rinsch will bring to life the stunning landscapes and enormous battles that will display the timeless Ronin story to global audiences in a way that’s never been seen before.

Dove Review

“47 Ronin” takes place in 17th century Japan, a time when each province was ruled by a military commander or Shogun. Ronin are wandering Japanese samurai who have no lord or master. The film is based on a legendary story of two Samurai warriors who despised each other and created years of mutual hatred. This story focuses on one group of 47 Ronin who struggle to restore their honor.

Typical of this genre of Japanese stories, the emphasis is on honor, loyalty, and sacrifice. The basis for these traits is the prevailing belief in Buddhist teachings that how adherents behave in this life, will determine their status in the life to come.

The film contains plenty of flashing swords and bows and arrows. While plentiful, the battle scenes are remarkably restrained. Violent events like beatings, beheadings and self-inflicted suicide by harikari, are not shown on-screen. However, the heads of two decapitated victims are displayed onscreen. There are a couple of unsuspected twists that will keep the audience’s attention.

All in all, “47 Ronin” is a violent action picture with lots of samurai battles, but not a graphic as many war pictures. It is unfortunate that the producers felt it necessary to hype up this version of the famous Japanese legend with a mystic shape-shifter, and magical monsters and demons, which were distractions from the basic storyline.

Due to violence, we are unable to award the Family Approved Seal to this film

Content Description

Sex: Two people kiss twice
Language: None
Violence: Many battles with swords, bows and arrows; lots of injured or killed warriors (not graphic); two beheadings (off-screen). one decapitated head shown to crowd
Drugs: Toast with Saki; spells cast on various characters; spider spreads hallucinogenic drug on man's lips
Nudity: Shirtless men
Other: Attributes of honor, loyalty, and sacrifice basic to the story; Buddhist teachings are prevalent but for cultural relevancy to the times and not intended to proselytize; A few magical creatures and monsters

Info

Reviewer: Dick Rolfe
Source: Theater
Company: Universal Pictures
Writer: Chris Morgan & Hossein Amini
Director: Carl Rinsch
Producer: Pamela Abdy
Genre: Action
Runtime: 110 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Starring: Keanu Reeves,
Hiroyuki Sanada,
Kô Shibasaki